5 Misconceptions In Fluid Conveyance

5 Misconceptions In Fluid Conveyance

5 Misconceptions in the Fluid Conveyance Industry

We at TCH Industries understand that the fluid conveyance industry is very confusing, and can be very misleading. Here is a list of 5 misconceptions that we see almost everyday. Click on the video for a Hose Pro to explain them the best!

5 Misconceptions Video

Minimum Bend Radius Vs. Force to Bend

A nominal bend radius can be easily misinterpreted as a hose’s ability to flex. When comparing two hoses with the same I.D. and minimum bend radius, you’ll find they don’t flex quite the same. Tube, cover, and reinforcement construction are the three main attributes that can determine a hose’s ability to flex. We recommend, if a hose’s ability to flex is important in your application, to get your hands on the hose to see what works for you.

Remember: Don’t confuse minimum bend radius with a hose’s ability to flex.

Teflon Tape on SAE Threads

It’s a very common misconception to believe that Teflon tape will improve any thread connection. On tapered threads it is acceptable to apply Teflon tape, but for parallel threads this is just not the case. Take JIC threads for example; the seat, or seal, is achieved on the 37-degree surface angle. On pipe thread, the seal is achieved via metal-to-metal wedging. When you apply Teflon tape to pipe thread, it lubricates the threads, also acting as an anti-seize for future maintenance.

Threaded connection with male and female halves

Hose Assembly Pressure Rating

Just like a hose consisting of multiple components-tubing, reinforcement, cover-a hose assembly is a combination of multiple parts. Let’s say we’re building a 2″ assembly with 2″ stainless steel cam & grooves on each end, but it has to be 500 psi. We find a hose-Parker 7107, rated to 500 psi-perfect! However, our stainless-steel cam and groove ends are only rated to 250 psi. This means regardless of the pressure rating of the hose we specced, our assembly is only rated to safely operate at 250 psi, due to our end connections.

Let your customer know: The lowest rated component of the assembly is the max working pressure.

BSPP is NOT Metric

Things can get hairy when metric threads come into play. We commonly see BSPP called out as a metric thread, when someone is specifying their adapters or hose ends. However when you think about it, British Parallel Pipe is measured in threads per inch and the outside diameter is measured in fractions of an inch. Inches are not metric. Metric threads are measured in millimeters per thread and are measured by the outside diameter of the threads in millimeters.

Threaded connection with male and female halves

Tubing and Hose

When talking about tubing and hose, it’s important to remember two things: hose is measured by I.D.-Inside Diameter, while tubing is measured by O.D.-Outside Diameter. Let’s say you’re brought a brake line that’s 3/8″ O.D. steel tubing. To correctly convert this to a hose assembly, you’ll want to use 3/8″ I.D. hose.

TCH Industries

We Are Hosers

Our focus and obsession is the distribution and fabrication of hose for industry and hose related products. Founded nearly 40 years ago, we are proudly owned and operated by the same family. Our manufacturing partners are some of the biggest and best names: Eaton, Parker, Dixon Valve, Hose Master, Brennen, Hannay Reels, and many others.

In short, we are a customer-centric hose company filled with happy professionals who can help you meet all your hose related needs. If you have any questions, please reach out to us by filling out the form below!

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Customer Success Story: Custom Hose Design Handles 4 Extreme Testing Conditions

Customer Success Story: Custom Hose Design Handles 4 Extreme Testing Conditions

Inlet manifold of an expansion joint

Custom Engineering an Innovative Hose Design to Function as an Expansion Joint to Meet the High Demands of Military Advanced Propulsion Concepts Testing

Few industries require more product validation and qualification than the military and aerospace sectors. Before any new technology is approved by regulatory agencies, they must undergo various levels of technology development — often in a simulated environment that’s designed to push products to their limits.

Above all, these tests must be accurate and reliable, delivering boundary conditions for performance and modeling validation and verification. Engineers can’t guarantee the reliability of their products if the testing equipment itself can’t produce accurate, repeatable results. That’s why designing functional test equipment is just as important as the products they test.

Challenges of Testing Environment

TCH Industries, a leader in custom hose and fittings, faced this demanding environment firsthand when one of its customers designed an Advanced Propulsion Concepts test facility for the U.S. military. To validate a new concept, the military has to create a custom testing environment that can simulate the following: 

  • High altitudes
  • Fluctuating environments 
  • Extreme pressures 
  • Extreme temperatures 

There was an eight-inch inlet system that would deliver air into the propulsion system to allow for reliable thrust output results. Standard bellows expansion joint designs were not feasible, as they would impart a force under the testing conditions.

Combined Technology Expertise

To overcome these challenges, TCH engineers partnered with Hose Master, a leader in metal hose and bellows expansion joints, to complete the custom hose design. Together, the companies created a custom U-loop expansion joint design that would hold up to military-grade functional testing, enabling the military to validate its Advanced Propulsion Concept. 

Learn more by reading our case study. 

TCH Industries

We Are Hosers

Our focus and obsession is the distribution and fabrication of hose for industry and hose related products. Founded nearly 40 years ago, we are proudly owned and operated by the same family. Our manufacturing partners are some of the biggest and best names: Eaton, Parker, Dixon Valve, Hose Master, Brennen, Hannay Reels, and many others.

In short, we are a customer-centric hose company filled with happy professionals who can help you meet all your hose related needs. If you have any questions, please reach out to us by filling out the form below!

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How to Identify the Right Threaded Connection

How to Identify the Right Threaded Connection

Identifying the right threaded connection
Hydraulic systems depend on fluid ports, connectors, and thread adapters to appropriately seal the equipment. Correctly identifying the right thread or connection type is critical to making sure that your hydraulic seals function properly, thus enabling leak-free system reliability and optimal pressure holding capacity.

However, if you choose the wrong type of thread, it can impair the sealing ability of the connection. This can lead to system damage, leakage, and potentially device failure, all of which cause more downtime and costly repairs or replacement parts.

Maintenance technicians and engineers can avoid these issues by using the fast, proven method of thread identification presented in this blog.

What is the Purpose of a Threaded Connection?

All threaded connections involve mating male and female halves together to create a connection to hold the threads together. This is necessary to create a proper hydraulic seal, though the threads themselves often do not form the seal itself.

Parallel, non-tapered threads are generally the recommended thread type for hydraulic systems. All parallel threads are meant to do is pull metal pieces together to allow the sealing mechanisms to work. The actual sealing mechanism is typically an O-ring, metal on metal compression, an elastomeric seal, a bonded seal (washer with a gasket attached to it), or a gasket (mostly in flanged threaded connections).

However, in certain thread types, such as National/British pipe taper threads, the thread can act as part of the sealing mechanism by screwing the metal in so hard that it deforms and seals the connection. The NFPA denounces tapered threads, though they are often still used for the sake of convenience.

Threaded connection with male and female halves

What are the Problems with Misidentifying a Connection Type?

The trouble with identifying thread types can lead to wasted time as operators struggle to get the right thread. This leads to increased downtime and lost profit.

However, the situation quickly gets even worse if you choose the wrong type of thread. Unfortunately, visual inspections alone are not always enough to see if a connection type is wrong.

When trying to mate two non-similar thread types, the threads can bind up because the pitch or the diameters are off. The threads will either not match up properly, or you could risk forcing them together, which would bind them together and not allow the sealing mechanism to compress.

What makes things even more confusing is that even matching up thread sizes is not a guarantee that your connection is correct. For example, SAE O-ring Boss and JIC fittings use the same sizes of thread, but the sealing mechanism is different. An operator can screw the threads together and think everything is fine, only to find out later when something goes wrong that it was never sealed. You can also ruin the connection if you cross threads, even with the same thread size.

All of these problems can lead to leaks, contamination, and device failure. Fortunately, you significantly mitigate the chance of these issues if you can identify the correct connection, to begin with.

What are the Main Types of Threaded Connections?

While many different types of threaded connections exist, operators and maintenance technicians can streamline their work by focusing on the connections most commonly seen in hydraulic systems. These types of connections include:

  • American Connections
    • NPTF, NPSM, SAE O-Ring Boss, O-ring Face Seal, and JIC
  • Metric
    • Metric Compression, Metric O-Ring Boss, Metric Taper
  • British
    • BSPP, BSPT
  • Japanese
    • JIS

Uncommon Connection Types

There are many uncommon connection types that are used throughout the hydraulic industry. Here are just a few examples. Although they are used less and less nowadays, certain older equipment may utilize Whitworth thread types, similar to British standard pipe threads. If you are working on military-grade systems or other highly regulated equipment, you may see the AN thread type, which is a variation of JIC used by the military.

Threaded hose connector measurements

How to Identify the Right Threaded Connection

If you know what to look for and the steps to take, identifying which type of threaded connection you need can be a rather efficient process. Here’s how to quickly identify the right type of threaded fittings:

Visually Identify the Sealing Mechanism

Looking at the connection type is the first step to any inspection. This will point you in the right direction and narrow down your options, crossing out options that are noticeably different. In some cases, the seal will be so unique that you only have one option.

  • Is it a cone-shaped seal? – JIC, SAE 45, NPSM, BSPP, JIS, Metric Compression, Komatsu, Metric Ball Seat
  • Is there an O-ring? – O-ring Face Seal, SAE O-ring Boss, Code 61 & Code 62 4 Bolt Flange, Metric O-Ring Boss, BSPP
  • Is the thread tapered? – NPT, BSPT, or Metric Taper

Measure and Compare

Typically, you will have a quite few different options based on your visual inspection. Finding the right connection then becomes a matter of comparing the designs of each type of connection to the part itself. Taking measurements of inner and outer diameters, threads, and angles, and then comparing those values with the data on the applicable charts (Thread Identification Chart), will help to validate this process.

Select the Right Thread Size

For every connection size, there will be a unique thread size associated with it. The size of the connection is the port size – you need a thread size larger than the port size to accommodate the connection.

As an example, a 3/4″ JIC connection port size has a 1-1/16″ outside diameter thread. Engineering drawings often make the mistake of specifying a thread size and confusing it with the port size – this will not work. Our recommendation is to call out the connection size and if necessary for QC to make a note about thread size. In other words, call the connection a 3/4″ JIC, and if you need to, declare the threads as being 1-1/16″ threads.

Selecting the right thread size for hydraulic hoses

TCH: Hose and Fittings for Any Industrial Application

Want to ensure your threaded connection is the right one? As dedicated hosers, the experts at TCH can ensure that you get the best fittings for all of your industrial and hydraulic hose application requirements.

No operation is too complex. Contact the Hose Pros at TCH today for help with all of your hose and fitting needs.

TCH Industries

We Are Hosers

Our focus and obsession is the distribution and fabrication of hose for industry and hose related products. Founded nearly 40 years ago, we are proudly owned and operated by the same family. Our manufacturing partners are some of the biggest and best names: Eaton, Parker, Dixon Valve, Hose Master, Brennen, Hannay Reels, and many others.

In short, we are a customer-centric hose company filled with happy professionals who can help you meet all your hose related needs. If you have any questions, please reach out to us by filling out the form below!

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Metal Hose Selection Guide

Metal Hose Selection Guide

Corrugated Metal Hose

AF4750 Metal HoseThe term metal hose refers to a hose where all components of the flexible portion of an assembly are stainless steel or any kind of corrosion-resistant metal. Similar to how we broke down hose in basic terms, a metal hose also consists of a tube and reinforcement.

The tube, in which 321 stainless steel is a standard material, carries the media; meanwhile, the wire braid—in this case, 304 stainless steel is more common—gives the tube strength to carry the pressure of the application. For better corrosion resistance, 316 stainless steel is the next step up; in more aggressive applications, we’ll also see materials such as Monel, Inconel, and Hastelloy.

End Connections

Ends for a metal hose assembly can be carbon or stainless steel, or any other metal that can be welded, brazed, or soldered to stainless steel. We talked briefly about end connections in Hose Pros 101, and those ends apply to metal hose assemblies as well. Some common end connections are NPT, pipe flanges, and pipe groove (Victaulic) connections. Like we do with industrial and hydraulic assemblies (as metal hose is just a more specified category within these categories), we also see JIC and cam and groove connections quite frequently. While these are just some of the most common connections, we can attach any metal fitting.

Temperature–Very High and Really Low

Unless specified, you may be wondering when you need to consider a metal hose versus a rubber or plastic hose for your assembly. One specification that stands out as an indicator for needing a metal hose is temperature. On one side, we have very hot applications, up to 1300°F. On this end of the spectrum, we have two considerations: outside environmental conditions, such as an assembly near a furnace in a steel mill; or, internal process conditions, like combustion gases or hot air for test facilities. Metal hose performs great at elevated temperatures, but be aware, stainless steel’s strength declines gradually as temperatures rise.

Working Pressure Derating Factor Chart

On the other hand, you may need to consider a metal hose for very cold (cryogenic) temperatures, -325°F and lower. Stainless steel improves mechanical properties as temperatures drop, even to cryogenic levels. The colder the temperature, the better they get. When thinking about your end connections, remember that carbon steel has an effective temperature range of 0-800°F; outside this range, its properties diminish quickly.

Permeation

Another property of metal hose is low permeation—zero leak rate. All rubber and plastic hoses will permeate molecules through the tubing over time. Functionally speaking, the metal hose has a zero leak rate.

Full Vacuum

Vacuum is another condition that could sway your decision between rubber and metal hose. Because of the low permeation, metal hoses can also be uniquely qualified for vacuum-rated applications. If you need to guarantee the highest level of vacuum rating, a metal hose is a great choice! Because of its corrugated design, it also handles full vacuum from a structural perspective.

Because metal hose can be made from the most chemically resistant metals, this can be another consideration point when deciding to choose metal hose. Metal hoses can withstand the most corrosive of environments. Keep in mind: One aspect of chemical resistance is thickness; a thick component has more material to corrode away and will inevitably last longer.

Abrasion

Close-up shot of a braided metal hose

Finally, it’s important to remember that metal hose is not particularly good with abrasion resistance, contrary to what you might think. The braid wires found in metal hose construction are only a few thousandths of an inch thick; if they’re put in an application where abrasion exists, they can quickly abrade and weaken until they eventually fail. In a scenario such as this, another layer of protection is required, such as a plastic spiral wrap or a strip-wound metal guard welded over the top of the assembly.

Metal hoses can also see this type of degradation from the high frequency of vibration in the system itself. The braid can cause abrasion on the crests of the corrugations. You can address an issue such as this by adding a sacrificial bronze braid layer in between the tube and stainless-steel braid; this softer bronze braid acts to protect both the tube and braid from degrading.

Hydroforming vs. Mechanical Forming

A metal hose starts as a flat strip, and it’s rolled and welded into a tube. This tube is then run through a corrugator to form the corrugation’s omega shape. There are two ways in which this is achieved:

  1. Hydroforming uses pressurized water to force the tube radially outward. This water pressure is uniform and, theoretically, reduces stress concentrations by applying an equal force on the material.
  2. Mechanical forming uses metal dies that stretch the metal onto the omega shape; this causes increased stress where the dies push and pull to stretch and bend the metal.

Other Considerations

Flexibility

Metal hoses can be manufactured with improved bend radius and flexibility. A compressed hose with a high number of corrugations per inch allows for greater flexibility and reduced force to bend.

Torsion

Keep in mind that a metal hose does not play well with torsion or twisting; this is something that can be avoided by proper installation. Using two wrenches to tighten a swivel nut will keep the hose free from torque. Proper routing is important too. Bending should occur in a single plane, as multi-planar bending creates torsion and decreases the service life of your hose.

High Velocity

The high velocity of the process fluid can be another consideration when looking into metal hoses. When referring to metal hoses, velocity is considered high at 75 ft/s or more. When your velocity goes above 75 ft/s, the media becomes turbulent, and the hose begins to whistle and vibrate. A flow liner of stripwound hose will smooth out the surface the media flows against and reduces turbulence.

Testing

At times, customers may require certain testing requirements. In the absence of a customer spec, every metal hose assembly built by a company using NAHAD standards receives an air-under-water test for one minute to look for leaks at the weld.

NAHAD suggestions include:

NAHAD Chart - Minimum Pneumatic Test Pressures

High-pressure pneumatic testing has been shown to result in fewer false-positive outcomes, meaning anything higher than 75 psi. Some pinhole leaks are so small they don’t register a bubble in one minute at pressures under 75 psi; however, increase the pressure, and bubbles form quicker. You can talk with your manufacturer to decide if this increased level of testing is right for you.

Welding & Inspection Certifications

This is another consideration driven by the customer. You must determine if your organization requires certification, as many do not. The most common certification for a metal hose is ASME Section IX, which tells you, as a buyer, that the weld procedure yields an effective weld, and that the welder is qualified to produce that weld. We won’t sugarcoat it: weld certifications are a labyrinth of understanding and interpretation. If you need details, give us a call and we’ll show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.

Weld inspections can also be performed by a certified inspector. Again, this is a customer-driven requirement. Inspections are normally non-destructive and simply visual. Increased levels use aids like liquid die penetrant to inspect the surface of the weld. Other non-destructive tests, like X-ray and ultrasonic, can detect discontinuities in the internal weld. There are other methods that must be discussed at the quoting and design stage but remember: visual inspection is a minimum requirement for all welds.

Oxygen Cleaning

Metal hose is a great choice when it comes to oxygen applications, especially industrial oxygen; however, certain care must be taken to ensure the hose is clean and free of hydrocarbons prior to use. Oxygen itself is not flammable, but in the presence of a fuel—typically hydrocarbons—it allows those fuels to ignite at lower temperatures and burn hotter. Metal hose is generally safe because the manufacturing process should not introduce fuel onto the surface of the hose.

When it comes to internal cleanliness, cleaning the inside of the hose and then capping the ends after it’s been fabricated can ensure the hose is safe to use. Cleaning methods and degree of cleanliness should be discussed during the quoting and design stage.

Minimum Length Requirements

Each size and style of hose has a minimum recommended live length, meaning the minimum length of the flexible portion of the hose must be able to flex and hold pressure, generally behaving like a hose. At lengths shorter than the minimum recommended live length, the hose tends to act more like a pipe, with little flexibility; these cannot be guaranteed to perform as expected. Most fabricators will make these short assemblies and simply state the length is shorter than recommended, which could void the warranty.

Metal Hose Manufacturers

Hose MasterOpinions vary on who makes the best metal hose. From a market dominance perspective, Hose Master is the most prominent. They have manufacturing facilities all over the U.S. and fabricating distributors in every city, so their product is readily available. They are constantly innovating their product and manufacturing processes, so their hose is always state-of-the-art. Penflex, US Hose, and others are also well represented in the U.S. and make a quality product.

As with many more specific applications, a metal hose has many different considerations. We’ve attempted to layout as much as possible, but each application differs from the next. If you find yourself needing assistance, call The Hose Pros at TCH for further guidance.

TCH Industries

We Are Hosers

Our focus and obsession is the distribution and fabrication of hose for industry and hose related products. Founded nearly 40 years ago, we are proudly owned and operated by the same family. Our manufacturing partners are some of the biggest and best names: Eaton, Parker, Dixon Valve, Hose Master, Brennen, Hannay Reels, and many others.

In short, we are a customer-centric hose company filled with happy professionals who can help you meet all your hose related needs. If you have any questions, please reach out to us by filling out the form below!

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Hose Repair: Tips to Extend Hose Life Before Buying a New One

Hose Repair: Tips to Extend Hose Life Before Buying a New One

Leaking Garden Hose

Industrial Hose & Hydraulic Hose Repair

There are many reasons for repairing your high-quality hoses and hydraulic hoses rather than simply buying a new one. First, hoses and fittings can be expensive equipment, so repair is often a more economical option than buying a new one. Another reason for repairing a hose is that often you’re in a time-critical jam or can’t wait for a new hose, such as when your equipment has broken down on-site during a construction or farming operation. If you need to get up and running right away, fixing a hydraulic hose may be your best option, so you’ll probably find yourself running to the nearest hose repair shop.

Types of Damage

When it comes to industrial hoses, the types of damage fall into four basic categories:

  1. Damage immediately behind the hose end: Anywhere you have a crimp, or banded connection naturally undergoes more stress when there’s any movement on the hose.
  2. Local external damage: Such as a scratch, dent, or impact damage.
  3. Overall external wear due to dragging: For example, in cleaning applications where the hose is regularly moved around and dragged on the ground or concrete. The other cause of external abrasion is simply the constant vibration of the hose in high-pressure applications. The vibrations from the pump cause it to rub on the ground and wear the outer coating. There’s not much that can be done to prevent this kind of damage—it’s the nature of this type of application. 
  4. Long-term use fatigue: When your hose fails because it’s gotten old with use, you know you’ve gotten the maximum lifetime out of the hose.

Replacing the Crimp

It’s simple to replace a hose-end—but there are two caveats to this. First of all, it shortens the hose’s length, so it’s only helpful in installments where you can afford to have a slightly shorter hose.

Eaton Weatherhead Hose BundleSecondly, particularly in fixing a hydraulic hose, it’s necessary to have the proper crimp spec. The crimp fitting is designed to meet SAE standards that guarantee the fit between the hose and end so the hose can withstand the high pressure required. What this means is that you need to have the ends from the same manufacturer as the hose. If you go to an Eaton Weatherhead manufacturer or supplier like TCH, we can only fit the Eaton Weatherhead hoses with Weatherhead ends. If you have Parker, Gates, or any other type of hose, you need to find a repair house that features those parts. Even the smallest deviation in the connection between the hose and end can cause a deterioration in performance, or even worse, be hazardous.

Often, we get people in our shop who want us to crimp to a different hose type, but it simply won’t work. Any decent repair technician will send you away if they don’t have the right match. Before you take a trip down to the repair shop, make sure they stock the manufacturer you need.

Making a Break

Tractor with industrial water hoseOften hoses will incur damage from impacts, such as a tractor running over the hose, a falling rock, or other impact types. The easiest way to deal with that kind of damage is by cutting and mending the hose. There are two ways to cut and mend a high-pressure or hydraulic hose.

The first way is to use a mender by putting a physical piece inside the hose and crimping it on both ends. The other way to mend a hose is to put two threaded pieces on either side of the splice and put a coupler in the middle. Sometimes people try to repair their hoses with duct tape. That might reduce the spraying, but at 3000 PSI of pressured liquid inside of your hose, obviously, duct tape isn’t a safe solution.

The second method is to splice and repair when the damage gets too bad in one particular spot. It’s possible to splice multiple times, though it’s not ideal. Every time you splice and fix a hydraulic hose or any hose, it degrades the hose slightly, both in terms of the length and in terms of the pressure loss of the liquid running through the hose. For basic cleaning applications, that can be fine. But if you are doing high-pressure spraying for sanitation, you really don’t want to splice more than once. Why? As the hose’s function is reduced, the water pressure goes down, and the time for cleaning goes up.

We’ve seen hoses with as many as six splice and repair joints, which may seem like it’s saving money, but is probably more trouble than it’s worth if you’re doing serious work.

Watch for Abrasion and Exposed Wires

When it comes to local external damage, a hose can be fixed with a cover repair if you catch the problem early enough. If you immediately care for any scratch on the cover of a hydraulic or high-pressure hose, you can protect the reinforcement. All hoses have a protective cover that ensures the reinforcement wire doesn’t get damaged internally.

However, if you ignore scratches or dents, they can corrode, which leads to either full replacement, splicing, or repairing. If you see an abrasion or exposed wires and are trying to hold off on a full replacement, you can add plastic spiral guards, metal spiral guards, or abrasion-resistant plastic sleeves to protect the area that is damaged. What’s important is that you protect the reinforcement wires from additional abrasion and corrosion.

Long-Shot Saves

Industrial steel millSituations, where you have to get your hose repaired right away, are common. Maybe your equipment has stopped right in the middle of a production run or during a harvest, and you can’t wait until the delivery of a new part. We understand. If it’s urgent, we find a way.

As an example, sometimes a hose and the port won’t be the same size. If there’s a small jump, say from 1 inch to 1.5 inches, we can find a fitting to reduce the size—but if it’s a big jump, like from 2 inches to half an inch, there’s a major mismatch. In a real emergency, we will fit a system with several stages of jumps from a larger to smaller or smaller to larger fitting. It’s not ideal, but if you’re really in a pinch, that is a repair that we’ve seen work at least temporarily until the system could be reconfigured.

A Hard Break: When It’s Time for a New Hose

When your hose is worn out from long-term, high-pressure use, it’s time to celebrate. You’ve gotten every last drop of use from your investment, and it’s time for a new hose. Wear and distortion can’t be fixed. When you have a hose, especially a hydraulic hose, the pressurizing and de-pressurizing of the tube eventually will reduce its ability to function and maintain high pressure. It’s worth remembering that there is no “forever hose” that lasts a lifetime. Even the highest quality hoses will wear out over extended use.

Conclusion

TCH Industries Hose Repair ShopIndustrial hoses and hydraulic hoses are designed for long-term use, and in many instances, replacement is a better option than fixing a hose. Hydraulic hose repair can extend the lifetime of a hose, get you out of a bind when something breaks down on a job site, or save a bit of money. Whatever the need, our service center is designed to get you back up and running when anything breaks down. The Hose Pros are standing by to help!

TCH Industries

We Are Hosers

Our focus and obsession is the distribution and fabrication of hose for industry and hose related products. Founded nearly 40 years ago, we are proudly owned and operated by the same family. Our manufacturing partners are some of the biggest and best names: Eaton, Parker, Dixon Valve, Hose Master, Brennen, Hannay Reels, and many others.

In short, we are a customer-centric hose company filled with happy professionals who can help you meet all your hose related needs. If you have any questions, please reach out to us by filling out the form below!

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